Foundation piecing presentation

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1. Foundation piecingã A great way to sew complex block designs with small piecesor odd angles that would otherwise be exceedingly difficultto piece precisely!ã Paper…
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  • 1. Foundation piecing• A great way to sew complex block designs with small piecesor odd angles that would otherwise be exceedingly difficultto piece precisely!• Paper serves as “foundation;” you just sew along the lines,piece by piece!• Paper will be removed at end of piecing process• For some methods, can use muslin and leave it in• The order pieces are sewn in follows the same rules asregular piecing: you want to sew each seam from beginningto end.
  • 2. Examples of suitable blocks
  • 3. Methods1. Classic paper piecing2. Freezer paper method3. Single template
  • 4. Useful supplies• Add-a-quarter ruler• Mini cutting mat to keep right next to your sewing machine• Depending on the method:• Lightweight foundation paper• Freezer paper
  • 5. Step 1 for all these methods:• Reverse your design!
  • 6. Classic paper piecing• You will sew along the lines on the paper, through both thepaper and the fabric.• The paper will become perforated and will tear away later.• The lighter weight your paper, the better.• Reduce stitch length to aid in pulling away paper.• Copy paper: no more than 1 mm (24/inch)• Foundation paper/newsprint: 1.5mm (18-20/inch)
  • 7. Classic paper piecing• Place first piece of fabric on the back of the foundation, rightside facing away from paper, and pin
  • 8. Classic paper piecing• Fold paper along line between piece 1 and piece 2
  • 9. Classic paper piecing• Place ruler along folded edge and trim seam allowance to¼”
  • 10. Classic paper piecing• Align edges of second piece of fabric with first piece, rightsides together
  • 11. Classic paper piecing• Unfold paper and sew along line, starting and stopping ~¼”past marked line
  • 12. Classic paper piecing• Unfold fabric and finger press (or use an iron, if you’re anoverachiever)
  • 13. Classic paper piecing• Pull seam allowances away from paper along line betweenpiece 2 and piece 3
  • 14. Classic paper piecing• Fold paper along line between piece 2 and piece 3, and trim.
  • 15. Classic paper piecing• Align 3rdpiece of fabric
  • 16. Classic paper piecing• Sew along line between pieces 2 and 3
  • 17. Classic paper piecing• Continue sewing pieces in this manner, trimming your seamallowances with each piece.
  • 18. Classic paper piecing• Press and trim your outside seam allowances to ¼”
  • 19. Classic paper piecing• Pull away the paper.
  • 20. Classic paper piecingMay need tosplit design intosections
  • 21. Classic paper piecing• You can use muslin for this method and leave it in.Thiseliminates the need to reduce stitch length.
  • 22. Pros & ConsPros Cons• Very precise• Easy to see exactly where you aresewing• Easy to make multiple templates(just print in bulk!)• Can foundation piece using muslin,eliminating paper-tearing phase• Must tear paper away; can bedifficult and/or annoying especiallyif pieces are small• Must reduce stitch length, so don’tmake a mistake!• Can be hard to line fabrics upright
  • 23. Freezer paper method• Same general concept as classic paper piecing, but you willuse freezer paper• Instead of sewing on the lines, you will fold the paper alongthe printed lines and then sew directly next to the fold.
  • 24. Freezer paper method
  • 25. Freezer paper method• Trace reversed pattern onto dull side of freezer paper
  • 26. Freezer paper method• If necessary, cut pattern apart along major sections
  • 27. Freezer paper method• Use iron to adhere wrong side of first piece of fabric to firstsection
  • 28. Freezer paper method• Pull freezer paper away enough to fold paper along linebetween first and second piece.Trim to ¼”.
  • 29. Freezer paper method• Align second piece of fabric (right sides together), but leavefreezer paper folded and sew as close to the fold as you canwithout sewing on the paper
  • 30. Freezer paper method• Unfold fabric and freezer paper, and press using your iron.1 23 45
  • 31. Freezer paper method• Pull back freezer paper just enough to fold back on linebetween pieces 2 & 3, and trim
  • 32. Freezer paper method• Align piece 3…
  • 33. Freezer paper method• Sew…
  • 34. Freezer paper method• Press…
  • 35. Freezer paper method• etc.
  • 36. Freezer paper method• When done (pretend I’m done…), trim outside seamallowances to ¼”.
  • 37. Freezer paper method• You can avoid reversing the pattern if you trace it onto theshiny side of the freezer paper using a Sharpie• To create multiples, trace once, then clip or staple severalsheets of freezer paper together and stitch along all the lineswith an unthreaded needle.This perforates the stack ofpaper and also allows for easier folding.
  • 38. Pros & ConsPros Cons• No sewing through paper meansno reducing stitch length and notedious tearing away of paper later• Freezer paper patterns arereuseable• Hard to make multiple copies• Must constantly move betweeniron and sewing machine• Must be careful not to allow fabricto come away from freezer paper,particularly at beginning if piecesare small• Must be careful that folds you sewalong are precise
  • 39. Single template method• Kind of painstaking, but allows for very complex piecing, andgives you freedom in which way your seam allowances arepressed• You can join a blockbroken up into sectionsthis way
  • 40. Single template method• Number your (reversed) freezer paper template
  • 41. Single template method• Press freezer paper to wrong side of fabric
  • 42. Single template method• Cut out pieces, leaving a ¼” seam allowance on all sides
  • 43. Single template method• Place pieces 1 & 2 right side together and use a pin to makesure that the corners of the freezer paper line up.
  • 44. Single template method• If the shapes are different, you may wish to actually pin usingextra-fine pins.
  • 45. Single template method• Sew along very edge of freezer paper. If you have linedeverything up well, you will be sewing along the very edge ofthe freezer paper on the bottom piece.
  • 46. Single template method• Continue adding pieces…
  • 47. Single template method• And press seam allowances to whatever side you wish!
  • 48. Single template method• Example of this method used to join sections of a largerblock
  • 49. Single template• Can be used to paper piece curvedpieces and pieces with insidecorners!• See Ruth B. McDowell’s books(particularly Piecing Workshop) fordetailed instructions on thesetechniques
  • 50. Pros & ConsPros Cons• Allows more complex shapes,including inside corners, Y-seams,and with some modification curves• No trimming of seam allowances,all pieces are cut to correct sizefrom start• Makes this method the leastwasteful of fabric• Useful if design is large• Can press seam allowances in anydirection• Difficult to line pieces up reallyprecisely• Lots of prep work before eversewing• Feels tedious for projects in whichfabric selection is not overly fussy
  • 51. Paper piecing by hand• English paper piecing• Similar to single template method, but done by hand• Great for patterns that involve a lot ofY-seams or insidecorners (e.g. hexagons, tumbling blocks, etc.)
  • 52. Pros & Cons SummaryMethod Pros ConsClassic paper piecing• Very precise• Easy to see exactly where you aresewing• Easy to make multiple templates (justprint in bulk!)• Can foundation piece using muslin,eliminating paper-tearing phase• Must tear paper away; can be difficultand/or annoying especially if pieces aresmall• Must reduce stitch length, so don’tmake a mistake!• Can be hard to line fabrics up rightFreezer paper• No sewing through paper means noreducing stitch length and no tedioustearing away of paper later• Freezer paper patterns are reuseable• Hard to make multiple copies• Must constantly move between ironand sewing machine• Must be careful not to allow fabric tocome away from freezer paper,particularly at beginning• Must be careful that folds you sewalong are preciseSingle Template• Allows more complex shapes, includinginside corners, Y-seams, and curves• No trimming of seam allowances, allpieces are cut to correct size fromstart• Makes this method the leastwasteful of fabric• Useful if design is large• Can press seam allowances in anydirection• Difficult to line pieces up reallyprecisely• Lots of prep work before ever sewing• Feels tedious for projects in whichfabric selection is not overly fussy
  • 53. How big to cut strips?
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